ROOV Interview

2 comments | Posted: 15 June 08 in Interviews, by Nathan Smith

A few weeks ago, I had lunch with Micah Davis, founder of the proactive Christian site, ROOV. I asked if he would describe the vision behind the start-up and he insisted his partners Jeremy Boles and Ryan Heneise be interviewed as well. Here are their thoughts on culture, community and Christianity.

ROOV


Nathan:

First off, give us a little background about the ROOV.com team. How would you each describe yourselves, in a nutshell?

Micah:

I play nicely and get along well with others, or so I was told while growing up. I am a native Floridian living in Dallas, TX and I am a big fan of pasta.

Jeremy:

I have been making websites for the past ten years. My wife and I live in the mountains of Colorado, at an elevation 7834 feet above sea level. I love coffee. At this point, my blood is 25% pure espresso.

Ryan:

I am a missionary kid turned programmer. I am the proud father of two beautiful girls. I am also a (currently off-duty) contributing author here at Godbit.


Nathan:

Lately, you have all been working full steam on ROOV. What is with that name? Is it a derivative of the word groove or roof?

Micah:

Ha, a derivative indeed! The name does not actually mean anything per se. We have defined it ourselves though, as a word meaning shared experience. ROOVs are the focal point by which like-minded people of faith can connect on a local level. Our aim was to shoot for an original name rather than something that is cliché in either Christian or secular cultures.


Nathan:

What initially prompted the notion behind ROOV? Explain a bit more how it came to be, and what it is all about.

Micah:

We all feel that lack of community has been a major deficiency within the body of Christ. For example, you cannot walk into any given church in America and ask: “Who is a twenty something that is passionate about missions in Uganda?” Or: “Who in my church has built a web app?” ROOV aims to be a bridge to facilitate community around these action oriented items. It is also intended to help be the interconnected pipes between various churches within a city.


Nathan:

What makes ROOV different from a secular social networking site like Facebook, or a localized mega church website? How is it unique?

Ryan:

ROOV is interesting because it does not come off like an exclusively Christian venture, though when you first go to the site, it does say a bit about church and city. The fact that it is a Christian site is just kind of a natural attribute of ROOV. If you go there you will likely meet up with a lot of other Christian folks who have similar interests and passions. Expressing and operating in faith seems very natural on ROOV. You do not have to go to the specifically Christian section. It already is baked right in.

Jeremy:

ROOV is more than just a Christian version of anything. It is addressing a very specific need that we see in the Church. We are hoping to bring unity to the body which will strengthen the Church as a whole. ROOV is designed so that people will not only get to know those in their own churches better, but also get to know other believers within their city. Our goal with ROOV is not just have another list of friends on a website, but to get people together offline discussing the things they really care about in life.


Nathan:

You have expressed your concern about mentoring being an important part of the “big-C” Church today. Tell me more about how that works for you locally in Dallas, and describe your vision for expansion, nationwide.

Micah:

Over the last decade or so, the buzz in Christian subculture was all about being relevant. More young adult programs, churches predominantly comprised of twenty somethings, etc. Don’t get me wrong, I think that is all good. However, somewhere along the way, I think that several other relational aspects became neglected. I find it more of a rarity these days for younger men to rub shoulders with older men in the church.

Heck, I am very active in my church and a socialite at the core. Yet, I find myself having infrequent to zero interaction with those that have “been there and done that” on this journey of faith. Not that we are setting out to accomplish this immediately with ROOV, but I would love to hear of some relationships like this forming between those that have done and want to do something.


Nathan:

Please share your testimony of how you came to faith in Christ, and share your advice for other Christians out there.

Micah:

I consider myself very blessed to have come to know Christ at an early age, which I attribute largely to my family. I would definitely challenge other followers of Christ to be more intentional when it comes to building community. Next time you approach your seat in the sanctuary, resist the urge to give in to the cliché head nod and instead greet someone with a smile and warm conversation. Why not start inviting others over for dinner once a week? Get to know those that God has placed around you. Do not stop there, while being internally focused is great, real communities thrive when they choose to serve the needs of others.

Discuss This Topic

  1. 1 Rick Curran

    Interesting project, any plans for making it available to the rest of the world? UK?

    :)

    Rick

     
  2. 2 Phil Brown

    Very nice site. Nothing quite like it in the UK, sadly

     

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